Blog

From Pompeï to Almere: The Digital City revives

With "The Digital City revives", Waag Society, Amsterdam Museum, Dutch Institute for Sound and Vision and University of Amsterdam want to address the problem of archiving our digital heritage. In this collaboration between museums, innovators, creative industries, archives and academia we will preserve The Digital City (DDS) for present and future generations. We will unlock and share new insights and methods for handling and preserving our cultural digital heritage scholars, heritage professionals and historians.

To share our findings and to place the heritage of the Digital City in perspective we organize four Hacking Heritage Labs. On the anniversary of the DDS, 15 January, the first one of those meetings was held. See the pictures here.

The next Hacking Heritage Lab takes place on the 4th of April and will further discus which archeological methods are assembled and how these will be used in practice to be able the archive The Digital City sustainably in an e-depot.

Recent blog posts

- Tuesday 18 April 2017

The work 'Parting the waves' of Semiconductor (artist duo Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt) is part of the exhibition 'Future Emerging Art and Technology'.

- Friday 14 April 2017

Clarity is a project funded by the European Commission in which a consortium, with (among others) Waag Society, formulates the starting points for future Open eGovernement services.

- Thursday 13 April 2017

End of March the project 'Applied gaming for a non-smoking generation' started. In this project we develop game elements for young (expectant) mothers in order to help them quit smoking.

- Thursday 06 April 2017

Internationally renowned artists and Future and Emerging Technology researchers team up and work for 9 months together in the cross-disciplinary FEAT initiative.

- Thursday 30 March 2017

For our project Smart Kids Lab, Lodewijk Loos visited the school de Regenboog ('The Rainbow') in Amsterdam (Gein).

- Monday 20 March 2017

What if you could measure nuclear radiation with the camera in your laptop or smartphone? Living near a nuclear power plant, you might take this opportunity very serious.