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Temporary residencies

AGA Lab and Waag Society present three artists in residence that experiment with digital fabrication, old and new print techniques and biotechnology.

Supported by the 'Tijdelijke Binnenlandateliers' (temporary workspaces) call of the Mondriaan Fund, AGA Lab, Waag Society’s Fablab, Open Wetlab and Textile Lab offer their facilities and expertise to Debra Solomon, Kaleb de Groot and duo Eva Pel & Claudia Doms during a residency period of approximately two months, culminating in an exhibition. The artists will develop new works in and between the distinct make-labs.

Debra Solomon
Debra Solomon is founder of Urbaniahoeve, Social Design Lab for Urban Agriculture. Urbaniahoeve (‘the city as our farm’) developed a food system infrastructure on several locations in the public space in The Hague and Amsterdam. These will transform the existing landscape into an eco system and implement in situ ‘topsoil production’.

Debra about her work: “During the AGA/Waag Society work period I intend to produce a number of new works as well as graphic techniques that use soil, humus, spores and pollen.” During her residency Debra learned the technique of soil chromatography and developed her very own version of it, using large circular probe paper of which she later at AGA lab made screen prints (see photo above).

http://staffroom.nl/debra_solomon

Eva Pel & Claudia Doms
They wil research and experiment how physical objects/artefacts, or the presumed existence thereof, live on in the digital space and create a new reality.

http://www.evapel.nl
http://claudiadoms.com

Kaleb de Groot
Kaleb de Groot describes his work as psycho-geography, a term that encompasses his work. He researches the relation between geographical locations/forms and the individuals that are active in, live in and/or make use of these environments. He worked on many projects in China, Zambia, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Curaçao and The Netherlands.

In the AGA-Lab and the labs of Waag Society he makes printed inflatables, that form a relation with the buildings and ruines he researched at the Dutch  Antilles — a logical continuation of his research in Genk (Flacc) how 3D-scanning and digital printing can be in the service of a personal sculptural practice. He also makes a series of blind stamps that form an imaginary portfolio of his projects and vocabulary of the past years.

http://kalebdegroot.nl

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