Blog

Open data, but greatly improved

Why did Waag Society develop the CitySDK? Governments are producing lots of information and this data is no mostly open for wider application. From city councils to national governments and the European Union: they all produce an enormous diversity of data. All of them with their own targets and means, from every specific part of the society.

The result? Thousands of websites with long lists of available datasets. A big step for mankind, especially from a democratic and civil service point of view. But whoever wants to use this data faces many problems: different data formats and refresh terms (once a week or once every three years?), data that suddenly is being transferred to another location (for a 'better' experience) and everyone is measuring and registering in their own way.

We tried to solve this in CitySDK. This API helps to open up data, provides essential tools for developing digital services in the city, and ensures that you can quickly make the most of the ever-growing technical possibilities. And because the platform allows for crowd-sourced data, it also facilites digital interaction amongst citizens themselves and between citizens and government.

Recent blog posts

- Friday 10 November 2017

As the means of digital fabrication become mainstream, the challenge of the maker movement lies in defining its values of sustainability, openness and critical making more visibly, says Marleen Stikker at the celebration of a decade of Fablab Amsterdam.

- Saturday 04 November 2017

The first Fablabs in The Netherlands emerged in 2007, but we were already looking for a workplace to create prototypes long before.

- Friday 03 November 2017

There is a new Dutch law on the intelligence services. Why do we have to worry about this law? Nina Boelsums explains.

- Wednesday 01 November 2017

Logging in and sharing data on the Internet is far too often unsafe, unreliable, costly, and manipulative. What are the alternatives?

- Thursday 26 October 2017

The first STARTS Talks was held in Berlin to discuss the advantages and challenges of collaborations between sciences, technology and the arts.