Blog

Open data, but greatly improved

Why did Waag Society develop the CitySDK? Governments are producing lots of information and this data is no mostly open for wider application. From city councils to national governments and the European Union: they all produce an enormous diversity of data. All of them with their own targets and means, from every specific part of the society.

The result? Thousands of websites with long lists of available datasets. A big step for mankind, especially from a democratic and civil service point of view. But whoever wants to use this data faces many problems: different data formats and refresh terms (once a week or once every three years?), data that suddenly is being transferred to another location (for a 'better' experience) and everyone is measuring and registering in their own way.

We tried to solve this in CitySDK. This API helps to open up data, provides essential tools for developing digital services in the city, and ensures that you can quickly make the most of the ever-growing technical possibilities. And because the platform allows for crowd-sourced data, it also facilites digital interaction amongst citizens themselves and between citizens and government.

Recent blog posts

- Tuesday 18 April 2017

The work 'Parting the waves' of Semiconductor (artist duo Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt) is part of the exhibition 'Future Emerging Art and Technology'.

- Friday 14 April 2017

Clarity is a project funded by the European Commission in which a consortium, with (among others) Waag Society, formulates the starting points for future Open eGovernement services.

- Thursday 13 April 2017

End of March the project 'Applied gaming for a non-smoking generation' started. In this project we develop game elements for young (expectant) mothers in order to help them quit smoking.

- Thursday 06 April 2017

Internationally renowned artists and Future and Emerging Technology researchers team up and work for 9 months together in the cross-disciplinary FEAT initiative.

- Thursday 30 March 2017

For our project Smart Kids Lab, Lodewijk Loos visited the school de Regenboog ('The Rainbow') in Amsterdam (Gein).

- Monday 20 March 2017

What if you could measure nuclear radiation with the camera in your laptop or smartphone? Living near a nuclear power plant, you might take this opportunity very serious.